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11 good habits for skin prone to redness

Triggered by a multitude of stimuli and often occurring with an unpleasant hot sensation, facial redness is not easy to live with! Read our tips for reducing its appearance and caring for your delicate skin each day.

1-Dry and sensitive skin types are the most frequently prone to redness. Make sure to properly hydrate your skin – preferably with high-tolerance skincare products specially formulated for skin that is prone to redness.

2-To cleanse your face, opt for a no-rinse, high-tolerance micellar water or cleansing milk applied with cotton wool, because reactive skin often doesn’t tolerate contact with water very well.

3-After showering or bathing, dry your face by patting it with a soft towel instead of rubbing, then moisturise it immediately.

4-Keep to a minimum the number of different products you apply to your skin. Once you have found skincare products you tolerate, to avoid the risk of skin reactions, stick with them and avoid testing others.

5-Make-up can help you even out your complexion: green correctors are particularly recommended for neutralising redness. However, be careful to choose only high-tolerance cosmetics specially formulated for sensitive skin that is prone to redness. You’ll find these in chemists.

6-Besides having a damaging effect on all skin types, the sun tends to exacerbate redness in people who are prone to it. As such, all year round you should use a high-SPF sunscreen on your face.

7-Avoid drinking alcohol or at least restrict yourself to small quantities: its vasodilator effect exacerbates skin redness.

8-Avoid eating overly hot or spicy foods and limit your consumption of hot drinks.

9-Steer well clear of soap and of lotions containing alcohol, as these are much too harsh for your delicate skin.

10-In winter, use a humidifier in your bedroom at least and do not overheat your interiors: the dry air in heated environments is harsh on the skin and can trigger redness.

11-More generally speaking, learn to detect the stimuli that trigger redness on your skin and avoid them as much as possible. Indeed, the more frequently the redness appears, the higher the risk of it becoming permanent.